FAQ

  1. Why don’t allergy tests results match those of ImuPro 300?
  2. What is the difference between IgG and IgE?
  3. What are the most common allergens?
  4. Does the ImuPro 300 test need to be repeated?
  5. My test results show I react to foods that I’ve never eaten before. How is this possible?
  6. Can I eat assorted frozen vegetables?
  7. I have an intolerance to lemon. Should I avoid citric acid?
  8. I have an intolerance to vanilla. Should I avoid vanillin?
  9. Where is Aspergillus Niger found, and how can I avoid it?
  10. Why don’t I react to all dairy products?
  11. What alternative products are there to replace cow’s milk?
  12. Why am I intolerant to milk, but not (or not more) intolerant to yogurt or certain cheeses?
  13. Is there a risk of calcium deficiency if I completely eliminate dairy products?
  14. How can I know if there is any milk protein in mass-produced food products?
  15. How do I know if there is any egg protein in mass-produced food products?
  16. Where can I find alternative products to eggs?
  17. If I have an intolerance to yeast, can I consume alcoholic drinks?
  18. What alternative products are there for yeast?
  19. Where can I buy these alternative products?
  20. What are the foods to avoid absolutely if I have gluten intolerance?
  21. Is gluten intolerance identical to celiac disease?
  22. Should I eat fish every five days only?
  1. Why don’t allergy tests results match those of ImuPro 300?

    The answer is simple: ImuPro 300 reveals slower responses related to the production of the IgG antibody. Other tests that reveal allergies detect immediate reactions that are due to the liberation of the IgE antibody. This is why they do not match.

  2. What is the difference between IgG and IgE?

    IgG reactions are more frequent if the intestinal flora are disturbed; however, they diminish if an adequate diet is adopted. IgE reactions generally occur in an isolated way and persist throughout life.

  3. What are the most common allergens?

    It is difficult to generalize. Food intolerances vary greatly from one individual to another. What is beneficial to one person may be bad for another. However, our experience with ImuPro 300 has demonstrated that milk, dairy products and cereals provoke immunological reactions in most people. Gluten, and the proteins in chicken eggs and yeast are powerful antigens, which must absolutely be avoided where an intolerance exists. This is not always easy, of course, since they are omnipresent and often well-hidden in commercial products.

  4. Does the ImuPro 300 test need to be repeated?

    No, it is not necessary to repeat the test. But even if the antibody is not evident at a later date, it does not necessarily mean you can eat any non-tolerated foods. The immune system possesses a memory that reacts to the production of any antibodies that resume contact with a non-tolerated food. However, if changes are made to the diet, most antibodies will disappear over time. Renewal of a physiological activity and the integrity of your digestive system will be decisive factors in preventing antibodies from coming into contact with food antigens. A repeat of the test is only indicated in cases where symptoms reappear despite a strict diet. This probably signifies the appearance of new intolerances, which can be revealed by repeating the ImuPro 300 test. For any person who wishes to re-take the test as a preventive measure, an interval of 2 years is recommended.

  5. My test results show I react to foods that I’ve never eaten before. How is this possible?

    Certain foods belong to the same family of vegetables – for example potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes and tobacco. It is also possible that you react to, say, soya – despite the fact that you’re convinced you’ve never eaten it. The explanation is that soya and its extracts are used in many foods. Thus, the constituents of soya have in fact been in contact with your immune system.

    This is the case for many foods that form part of the ImuPro 300 test (e.g., poppy is present in a modified form in many medications). Many foods can contain the same chemical agents.

  6. Can I eat assorted frozen vegetables?

    Yes. However, you must not eat the same assortment each day.

  7. I have an intolerance to lemon. Should I avoid citric acid?

    No. Citric acid is produced by chemical synthesis and consequently has a different composition.

  8. I have an intolerance to vanilla. Should I avoid vanillin?

    No. Vanillin is an artificial aroma and has a different composition to vanilla.

  9. Where is Aspergillus Niger found, and how can I avoid it?

    Aspergillus Niger is a form of mildew present nearly everywhere that generally contaminates dry food, dried fruits, nuts, fermented teas and herbal teas, when they are exposed to humidity during storage.
    Also, Aspergillus Niger or its extracts may be used in the food industry as a non-declared additive. The principal products affected are: bread, beer, cheese, chocolate, fruit juices, and especially precooked meals. Avoid mass-produced foods. Opt for teas that you buy in a pharmacy. Limit your consumption of products at risk.

  10. Why don’t I react to all dairy products?

    During the processing of milk, proteins are either transformed or present in lower quantities, e.g., as in butter. This is why it is quite possible that you do not react to all dairy products.

  11. What alternative products are there to replace cow’s milk?

    There are many:
    - Goat’s milk and cheese
    - Ewe’s milk and cheese
    - Oat milk (avoid if intolerant to gluten)
    - Pine nut milk
    - Almond milk
    - Soya milk
    - Cocoanut milk
    - Rice milk

  12. Why am I intolerant to milk, but not (or not more) intolerant to yogurt or certain cheeses?

    You have an intolerance to the proteins in cow’s milk. Yogurts and cheeses are by-products, created by acidification or fermentation. These processes alter the nature of milk protein and can neutralize the antigenic effect of the milk protein, or may have the opposite effect and amplify them. Also, antigenic structures from the micro-organisms used during fermentation can form together.

  13. Is there a risk of calcium deficiency if I completely eliminate dairy products?

    No! All the alternatives to milk are enriched with calcium. By rotating them, and regularly including legumes in your meals, calcium deficiency is not likely. Broccoli also has a high calcium content. In cases of extra need, it is advisable to take calcium pills with meals. On this subject, see Chapter 2 of the patient booklet, where you will also find a list of foods that are rich in calcium.

  14. How can I know if there is any milk protein in mass-produced food products?

    Milk protein can be hidden behind the following names:

    - lactoglobulin, casein
    - lactalbumin, milk protein
    - whole, powdered, creamed, concentrated milk, etc.
    - butter, babutter
    - yogurt, cream
    - thick cream, sour cream
    - lactoserum

  15. How do I know if there is any egg protein in mass-produced food products?

    The egg protein can be hidden behind the following names:

    - egg yolk, egg white
    - ovalbumin, livestin
    - albumin, lysozyme E1105
    - globulin, ovomucoid
    - lecithin E322

  16. Where can I find alternative products to eggs?

    In health food stores.

  17. If I have an intolerance to yeast, can I consume alcoholic drinks?

    Every alcoholic beverage is derived from a fermentation process based on yeast, which is present naturally in the case of wine and added in the brewing of beer.
    Since the yeast is subjected to enzyme breakdown during the fermentation, there remain some soluble yeast proteins in the final product, even after filtration. However, the concentrations vary, in the following descending order:
    - beer
    - champagne
    - white wine
    - red wine
    - distilled spirits

    Avoid alcoholic drinks at the start of your new diet and only start consuming then again in small quantities and if they have low yeast protein content (e.g., wine), and only when you see a marked improvement in your general condition.

  18. What alternative products are there for yeast?

    Either chemical yeast, or preferably baking fermenting agents or leaven.

  19. Where can I buy these alternative products?

    In health food stores and certain bakeries.

  20. What are the foods to avoid absolutely if I have gluten intolerance?

    Cereals: wheat, barley, rye, oat, kamut, spelt. Also, any foods made from these: bread, bread crumbs, flour, crackers, cookies, pastries, pies, pizza, pasta, malt, beer. See also Chapter 2 of the patient booklet.

  21. Is gluten intolerance identical to celiac disease?

    Not necessarily. Celiac disease takes about 13 years to develop, with antibodies appearing at different stages of the illness.
    To establish a diagnosis of “celiac disease” there must be present in the blood the antibody that works against the gliadine, transglutaminase and endomysium. Confirmation through intestinal biopsy is necessary to make the final diagnosis – and also to qualify for partial reimbursement of the cost of gluten-free foods from contributory sickness funds.
    At the beginning, the symptoms are non-specific, becoming worse over time. The anti-gluten IgG antibodies indicated by ImuPro 300 are generally the first antibodies to appear, thus allowing a very preliminary diagnosis. For an asymptomatic person, the presence of specific IgG antibodies probably indicates a higher risk of developing celiac disease. The treatment of this condition remains the same, independent of the stage of the affliction, i.e. total exclusion of gluten.

  22. Should I eat fish every five days only?

    If you want to, you can eat fish every day. However, you cannot eat the same species every day. That is, if you eat red mullet the first day, you should wait five days before consuming it again. In the meantime, you can eat other varieties of fish, each of which should then be avoided for the next four days. Together with different types of meat, you have many possible ways to organize a varied rotation plan.